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History and making of famous Ardabil Carpet

The Ardabil Carpet, is the world's oldest dated carpet and one of the largest, most beautiful and historically important in the world. In 2006, the V&A created a case in the centre of Room 42: The Jameel Gallery of Islamic Art, so that the carpet could be seen as intended, on the floor. To preserve its colours, it is lit for ten minutes on the hour and half-hour.
 

The Ardabil Carpet on display in the Jameel Gallery, V&A

The Ardabil Carpet on display in the Jameel Gallery, V&A

 

Check out our aghan rugs collection at: http://alrug.com/afghanistan-rugs.html

 

History of the Ardabil Carpet

Why the Ardabil Carpet was made

One of the main sights in the town of Ardabil in north-west Iran is the shrine of Shaykh Safi al-Din Ardabili, who died in 1334. The Shaykh was a Sufi leader, who trained his followers in Islamic mystic practices. After his death, his followers remained loyal to his family, who became increasingly powerful. In 1501, one of his descendants, Shah Isma’il, seized political power. He united Iran for the first time in several centuries and established the Shi’i form of Islam as the state religion. Isma’il was the founder of the Safavid dynasty, named after Shaykh Safi al-Din.

 Anteroom to the tomb of Shaykh Safi al-Din, commonly called the Hall of Lamps

Anteroom to the tomb of Shaykh Safi al-Din, commonly called the Hall of Lamps

 

The shrine of Shaykh Safi al-Din Ardabili (the impressive tomb tower on the right in this photograph). The other shrine buildings were added around it.

The shrine of Shaykh Safi al-Din Ardabili (the impressive tomb tower on the right in this photograph). The other shrine buildings were added around it.

 

The Safavids, who ruled without a break until 1722, promoted the shrine of the Shaykh as a place of pilgrimage. In the late 1530s, Isma’il’s son, Shah Tahmasp, enlarged the shrine, and it was at this time, too, that the carpet was made as one of a matching pair.

The completion of the carpets was marked by a four-line inscription placed at one end. The first two lines are a poetic quotation that refers to the shrine as a place of refuge:

‘Except for thy threshold, there is no refuge for me in all the world.

Except for this door there is no resting-place for my head.’

Plan of the shrine at Ardabil, showing where the carpets were situated

Plan of the shrine at Ardabil, showing where the carpets were situated 

 

 

The in wool and silk Width approx 535.5cm x length approx 1044cm Museum no: 272-1893 Translation of text woven into carpet: 'Except for thy threshold, there is no refuge for me in all the world. Except for this door there is no resting-place for my head. The work of the slave of the portal, Maqsud Kashani.' Maqsud was probably the court official charged with producing the carpets. He was not necessarily a slave in the literal sense but called himself one to express humility, while the word for 'portal' can be used for a royal court or a shrine. Perhaps Maqsud meant both, as in this case the court was the patron of the shrine. The fourth line contains the date 946 in the Muslim calendar, which is equivalent to AD 1539 – 1540.

 

 Ardabil Carpet Ardabil, North-west Iran 1539 – 1540 Hand knotted carpet

The Ardabil Carpet Ardabil, North-west Iran 1539 – 1540 Hand knotted carpet in wool and silk Width approx 535.5cm x length approx 1044cm Museum no: 272-1893 Translation of text woven into carpet: 'Except for thy threshold, there is no refuge for me in all the world. Except for this door there is no resting-place for my head. The work of the slave of the portal, Maqsud Kashani.' Maqsud was probably the court official charged with producing the carpets. He was not necessarily a slave in the literal sense but called himself one to express humility, while the word for 'portal' can be used for a royal court or a shrine. Perhaps Maqsud meant both, as in this case the court was the patron of the shrine. The fourth line contains the date 946 in the Muslim calendar, which is equivalent to AD 1539 – 1540.

 

How The Ardabil Carpet Was Made

Detail showing pile of Ardabil Carpet

Detail showing pile of Ardabil Carpet

 

The basic structure of the carpet is hidden by the pile. Like most textiles, it consists of warps and wefts. The warps are the threads running the length of the carpet. The wefts are the threads that run across its breadth. Both warps and wefts are made from silk, which is a very strong fibre when new.

The first stage in production was to tie the warps on to a huge, vertical loom. The weavers then knotted short lengths of wool around the warps to create a row of pile. When the whole row was finished, they inserted three rows of weft over and under the warps to hold the knots in place. The pile was then packed down with a special comb-like beater. Finally, the pile was trimmed with special scissors to achieve a uniform length. This process was repeated again and again until the huge carpet was finished, when a final trimming would have taken place.

The pile is made from wool, which holds dye much better than silk. The pile is very dense - there are about 5300 knots per ten centimetres square (340 knots per square inch). This density allowed the designer to incorporate a great deal of detail, but making such a large carpet with so many knots would have taken a team of skilled weavers several years.

Up to ten weavers may have worked on the carpet at any one time. Most carpet weaving was done at home by women, but for a court commission such as this, the weavers may have been men.

The weavers would have worked from drawings provided by a specialist designer. The patterns are generally symmetrical, but there are often small differences between the two halves. This suggests that the drawings showed the overall pattern required but not the colour of each knot.

The pattern includes ten colours. The wool was dyed in batches using natural materials such as pomegranate rind and indigo, so the shades vary slightly. For example, the blue background appears to 'ripple' where darker and lighter batches of wool were used.

The direction of the pile shows that the weavers began at the end with the smaller lamp. The colours are best viewed from that end.

Structure of the Ardabil Carpet                                                    The type of knot used to create the pile of the Ardabil Carpet

                      Structure of the Ardabil Carpet.                                                                        The type of knot used to create the pile of the Ardabil Carpet

 

The Design of the Ardabil Carpet

The entire surface of the Ardabil carpet is covered by a single integrated design - an impressive feat in view of the great size of the carpet. The basic design is relatively simple, and its components are well-balanced. Richness and variety are added by the use of contrasting background colours and the subtle differences between the filler patterns. 

The border is composed of four parallel bands. It surrounds a huge rectangular field, which has a large yellow medallion in its centre. The medallion is surrounded by a ring of pointed oval shapes, and a lamp is shown hanging from either end. This centrepiece is matched by four corner-pieces, which are quarters of a similar but simpler composition, without the lamps.

 

Detail showing the central medallion, Ardabil Carpet

Detail showing the central medallion, Ardabil Carpet

 

The Two Lamps

The lamps shown hanging from the centrepiece are of different sizes. Some people think this was done to create a perspective effect – if you sat near the small lamp, both would appear to be the same size. Yet there is no other evidence that this type of perspective was used in Iran in the 1530s, when the carpet was made. What is more, the lamps themselves are shown as flat shapes rather than as three-dimensional objects.

Another view is that the difference is a deliberate flaw in the design, reflecting the belief that perfection belongs to God alone.

 Detail showing the central medallion, Ardabil Carpet

Detail showing the central medallion, Ardabil Carpet

 

The Filler Patterns

Each part of the design is filled with one or more types of scrollwork set with fantastic flowers or leaves. In some there are also symmetrical snaking forms that represent clouds.

The largest and most complex of these patterns covers the dark-blue background of the main field. Here two sets of scrolls are laid one on top of the other. As with the lamps, however, there is no attempt to create a sense of depth.

The flatness of the pattern matches the flat surface it decorates. This harmony between shape of an object and its decoration is characteristic of Islamic art, and it is something that the founders of the V&A greatly admired.

 

Detail showing the filler patterns in the Ardabil carpet

Detail showing the filler patterns in the Ardabil carpet

 

Comparisons With Other Carpet Designs

Chelsea carpet from Iran is a little older than the Ardabil carpet, and it is also very beautiful, but its design was created in a very different way. The Ardabil carpet is covered by a single, integrated design, whereas the pattern on the Chelsea carpet was loosely assembled from many different elements.

The main field of the Chelsea carpet has two X-shaped arrangements of medallions with dark backgrounds. The large gap in the middle is filled with a round fish pond flanked by two huge Chinese-style vases. Half of this composition is repeated at each end of the main field. The rest of the field contains many relatively small motifs: trees in flower or in fruit, pairs of animals in combat or grazing, and sections of a fantastic scrollwork pattern.

The presence of animals in the design suggests that the Chelsea carpet was made for a secular setting. There are no animals in the design of the Ardabil carpet, which we know was made for use in a religious building.

The large Uşak carpet from Turkey is a little older than the Ardabil carpet. The medallions in its design are so large that they have become the dominant element.

The design of the Ardabil carpet is more successful. The ring of pointed ovals and the two lamps increase the size of the centrepiece, allowing it to fill the available space. At the same time, though, the gaps within it ensure that the centrepiece does not become so dominant that it overwhelms the rest of the design.

The Chelsea Carpet. Museum no. 589-1890

The Chelsea Carpet. Museum no. 589-1890

 

Uşak medallion carpet. Museum no. T.71-1914

Uşak medallion carpet. Museum no. T.71-1914

 

 

Author: Victoria and Albert Museum

The Victoria and Albert Museum's collections span two thousand years of art in virtually every medium, from many parts of the world, and visitors to the museum encounter a treasure house of amazing and beautiful objects. The story of the V&A's foundation helps to explain its astonishing richness and diversity. The Museum was established in 1852, following the enormous success of the Great Exhibition the previous year. Its founding principle was to make works of art available to all, to educate working people and to inspire British designers and manufacturers. Profits from the Exhibition were used to establish the Museum of Manufactures, as it was initially known, and exhibits were purchased to form the basis of its collections. The V&A holds over 19,000 items from the Middle East and North Africa, ranging from the early Islamic period (the 7th century) to the early 20th century. The collections include holdings of metalwork, ceramics, architectural woodwork and textiles, in particular from Iran, and also from Turkey, Egypt, Iraq, Syria and the countries of North Africa

 

 

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